Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order Developer Says the Game is Similar to Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice


Launching this November, Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order is easily one of the most anticipated games of the year. In a new interview for EDGE Magazine’s September issue, Game Director Stig Asmussen and Lead Combat Designer Jason de Heras discuss drawing inspiration from Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice developer FromSoftware.

“I’ve been a huge FromSoftware fan since King’s Field,” said Asmussen. “I mean, King’s Field II is one of my favorite games ever. But it’s not about you liking a game, and trying to make that game myself. It’s more, ‘What can we learn about what’s fun about it?’”

Additionally, Jason de Heras jumps in the interview and discusses FromSoftware’s Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice being “very similar” to Jedi Fallen Order:

“I thought it was pretty badass, and a little comforting to know that you could this type of game without a stamina bar. They let you attack, they let you roll, they let you do all this for free – and then the AI will tell you if you’re doing the correct thing,” de Heras said. “It just confirmed to us that you don’t have to limit everything the player does; let them have a little more agency, and then let the AI give them a slap on the wrist or a punch in the face. It was a positive thing for us to know there was a game that was similar to ours. Very similar.”

Recently, developer Respawn Entertainment discussed the possibility of having a photo mode in the game alongside a new game plus mode. Additionally, Respawn released the full E3 demo online everyone to check out.

Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order launches on November 15 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. The game is available for preorder on Amazon now.

The post Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order Developer Says the Game is Similar to Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice by David Gill appeared first on DualShockers.



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This Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Inspired PC Is Pure Art


Seeing other people’s creations and how they go about designing them is a huge highlight for me, so when I saw a Sekiro-inspired PC case made by the talented folk over at Future Works, I wanted to share it with our readers here at DualShockers. Even if you don’t own a PC or have the first clue (or interest) in what makes them tick, I think most people would appreciate the unbelievable craftsmanship that has gone into this build.

Future Works, the very hands that molded this unique PC case, are based in Spain and they have teamed up with Activation, Intel Spain, and Corsair Spain to help create their incredible custom-built rig inspired by Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice. As seen in the short clip below, the entire unit is built around a Tori which is a traditional Japanese gate most commonly found at the entrance of or within a Shinto shrine. Right in the middle of this beautiful gate, the GeForce RTX 2060 sits as its centerpiece. A really nice touch here is the laser-printed letters that form on the wood paneling at the bottom of the case and right in the center of the GeForce graphics card too.

At first glance, you’re probably wondering where all the cables, etc to this rig are? Thankfully, they are cleverly concealed in the stone and wooden support beams which can come off when you need access to the GPU power cables. Under the delicately designed roof structure, you’ll find three Corsair HD120 RGB fans nested within orange modded liquid-cooled tubes so the CPU can stay nice and cool, but most of the computer components are hidden away at the base of the PC case. This PC isn’t just a pretty face as laying below that impressive exterior you’ll find some really good specs that include:

MSI MPG Z390I Gaming Edge Motherboard
Intel Core i5-9600K
Nvidia GeForce RTX 2060
Corsair MP510 NVMe 480GB SSD
Corsair Vengeance LPX 32GB DDR4 3000MHz RAM
Corsair H150i Pro AIO
Corsair SF750 PSU

You can check out the Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Inspired PC case mod video for yourself below and find out how it got made:

If you’re into Sekiro-inspired things, then I would recommend checking out this amazing Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice limited edition PS4 Pro console – It’s a beauty! If you have yet to play Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice, you can go ahead and pick up the title over on Amazon right now and if you’re still in two minds whether you should indeed pick Sekiro up, our 9/10 review on the title may help make your mind up.

The post This Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Inspired PC Is Pure Art by Rachael Fiddis appeared first on DualShockers.



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Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Cinematic Short Film Produced by a Fan Looks Exceptional


Even though FromSoftware’s Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice has been out for over three months now, the title still manages to stay in the news and rightly so. The hard-hitting and notoriously difficult game sold over 2 million copies worldwide across PS4, Xbox One, and PC in fewer than 10 days after release. Players of the title were captivated by the story-line and intrigued by the steep learning curve that only heightened their desire to come back for more; time and time again.

Over on YouTube, one of these devoted fans who goes by the name of TheParryGod has stitched together a remarkable short film that showcases the beautiful scenery and lore of the action-adventure game that features Wolf, a highly skilled shinobi who serves Kuro, the Divine Heir. We witness the fluid transition between shots that seamlessly flow into the next including the wonderful timing of the dialogues and monologues, you’d almost be mistaken that you were watching a trailer for an upcoming movie it’s that well done.

TheParryGod uses the popular OBS to record this short film, Vegas Pro 14 and Photoshop to craft those clever edits, and Cheat Engine, Sekiro Fps Unlock and ReShade for all other creative elements that bring Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice to life – right in front of our eyes. If this doesn’t inspire some Hollywood studio to get moving on a Sekiro movie or maybe even follow into the same light as The Witcher, then I’m not sure what will!

You can check out the entirety of the film below and enjoy it to it’s fullest. If you have yet to play Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice, you can go ahead and pick up the title over on Amazon right now. If you’re still in two minds whether you should indeed pick Sekiro up, our 9/10 review on the title may help make your mind up.

The post Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Cinematic Short Film Produced by a Fan Looks Exceptional by Rachael Fiddis appeared first on DualShockers.



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Game of Thrones Creator George R.R. Martin Confirms Work on a Japanese Video Game, Adding Credence to FromSoftware Rumors


Earlier this year, a new rumor stemming from YouTube channel Spawn Wave stated that Game of Thrones creator George R.R. Martin was working in collaboration with Dark Souls and Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice developer FromSoftware on a new project of sorts. To many, the rumor seemed too wild to be true, but as of now, it may have just become all the more likely.

In a new blog post from Martin’s official website, the famed writer himself confirmed that he has indeed been working on a video game project. Martin touched on this when talking about the work that he has coming up in the future now that the Game of Thrones TV show has ended. He also specifically mentioned the region in which the game is from simply saying, “I’ve consulted on a video game out of Japan.”

Obviously, this doesn’t specifically mean that Martin is indeed working with From on a new title, but it really makes you think, doesn’t it? While there are hundreds of different developers that Martin could be working with out of Japan, it’s easy to immediately assume that FromSoftware is the developer in question given what we’ve heard previously.

It’s also worth throwing out there that I’ve heard similar murmurings of Martin working with FromSoftware in the past, long before the original rumor started making waves earlier in this year. I’ve never had enough information or sources on the project that would warrant me talking about the potential collaboration in a separate story, but considering this rumor seems to be getting more possible at this point, I figured now was as good of a time as any to mention what I have heard. Obviously, don’t take it as complete truth just yet, but I wouldn’t be surprised if this crossover is real.

Hopefully, if this collaboration is actually happening, we hear something of it sooner rather than later. I know that the idea of Martin working with one of my personal favorite developers in FromSoftware gets me extremely excited. Maybe if we’re lucky, E3 2019 could be where the existence of this title that Martin has worked on will be unveiled.

The post Game of Thrones Creator George R.R. Martin Confirms Work on a Japanese Video Game, Adding Credence to FromSoftware Rumors by Logan Moore appeared first on DualShockers.



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Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Review — The Will to Continue On


I’ve always struggled to play games when I’ve had some sort of personal turmoil happening in my life. While a lot of people find the comfort of video games to be in how they allow them to escape the real world, for me, I just find it to be a hard medium to dedicate time to when I know that other areas of my life aren’t going well.

In the past few weeks that I have been playing Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice, I’ve been encountering this exact issue. For the latter portion of March and now a bit of April, I’ve been having a personal health scare that has left me stressed more than I have been in awhile. To make this clear before I go on any further, I’m completely fine. What has transpired isn’t life-threatening in the slightest and I’m in the process of getting myself fixed with whatever is wrong. Don’t worry.

I share this all up front not only to make it clear as to why this review is so late (I’m sorry) but to give you an idea of what my frame of mind has been while playing Sekiro over the past few weeks. Sekiro is a game about death first and foremost. Heck, it’s right there in the title with Shadows Die Twice. But at its core, like so many other FromSoftware titles, it’s a game about overcoming hardships, learning, and adapting to the situations you’ve been presented before continuing onward.

Over the past decade or so, FromSoftware has established itself as the premier developer in the realm of action games, and that title hasn’t been lost here with Sekiro. Much like the Souls games before it, Sekiro has a clear vision of how it wants you to approach it and quickly establishes a ruleset of how you are meant to play.

This is most clear in the combat of Sekiro, which is easily the game’s best element. Unlike the Souls games, Sekiro has you engaging in a more precise, dueling style of play that sees you often facing off one versus one with enemies that you come across. It’s much different from games like Bloodborne where you can run around with large two-handed weapons like Ludwig’s Holy Blade and bash foes over the head. No, Sekiro instead asks you to pick and choose your points of attack more so than ever before, but the reward for doing so is arguably greater than any past FromSoftware game.

Combat in Sekiro centers entirely around a system known as Posture. Rather than dealing direct damage to an enemy’s health bar with your katana strikes, you’ll instead be working to wear down their Posture bar before then dishing out an immediate killing blow — unless said enemy can withstand more than one of these strikes. I talked a bit about the Posture system in my previous piece with some of my early impressions from Sekiro, but this mechanic has only grown on me the more I have played.

What I love about this style of combat that is centered around this tug-of-war with Posture is that it constantly forces you to be the aggressor. Pressing the attack is something I was not used to coming into Sekiro. Past Souls games have taught me to cheese bosses at times more than it has taught me to actually “git gud.” With Sekiro though, it really feels like you have to learn the patterns of your enemies well enough to know both when you can strike and when you can defend. If you don’t stay on top of baddies as well, then their Posture bar will start to reset and you’ll have to grind them down all over again.

In typical FromSoftware fashion, Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice‘s best moments come when you must implement what you’ve learned about combat into a boss fight. Boss fights have always been synonymous with FromSoftware and I think Sekiro might offer the studio’s best array of bosses ever. Not only are each of their designs and play styles so varied from one another, but each fight seems to teach you something new that you then need to carry forward with you through the remainder of the game. Whether that’s implementing your character’s prosthetic tools, learning how to parry more effectively, or just simply adapting your own play style on the fly, Sekiro is constantly throwing a wrench into what you think you know and forcing you to then overcome what it is presenting.

In a personal situation though where I was struggling to even commit to spending my free time on gaming, I think what I appreciated the most about Sekiro were its moments of elation and victory. If you’ve played a Souls game before, you’re likely very familiar with these instances; the times where you beat your head against a wall for so long only to then finally accomplish the task at hand and advance. While I was playing Sekiro, I sometimes found it difficult to focus on spending so much time dying to bosses, only to keep repeating the process and making no ground.

Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

You can get pretty antsy and nervous when you’re sitting around your apartment waiting for MRI results on your brain to come through. Even when I was doing battle with bosses like Lady Butterfly or Genichiro Ashina, instead of trying to pinpoint their attack patterns and strikes, I was miles away focused on things outside of the world of Sekiro. It wasn’t that I wasn’t engaged on what was happening in the game, but more that I was just struggling to even focus.

Because of this though, it made those moments where I did lock in and focus on hack-and-slashing these enemies to death feel that much better. The reward and sense of achievement I felt when I did finally beat a difficult boss gave me a much-needed boost in morale during a time where I really needed it. There’s a lot of reasons to like video games, but overcoming these struggles in Sekiro helped remind me of why I like to play games in the first place. This war of attrition and unwillingness to give up in the face of something that seems greater than you while playing Sekiro really helped change my frame of mind during every area other of my life over these past weeks. Sekiro showed up just when I needed it most.

When I wasn’t just defeating bosses though after multiple hour struggles, I also fell in love with the world of Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice and the way you can get around it. Verticality plays a large role in Sekiro with your character, the One-Armed Wolf, being able to utilize his grappling hook prosthetic arm to vault around to various locations. Not only can these newfound vantage points be used to stealthily take out foes, a welcome addition to Sekiro, but it also just allows you to rethink your approach to combat as a whole.

I also appreciated how much Sekiro encourages you to go off the beaten path. FromSoftware games have always done a good job of rewarding you if you explore, but I found Sekiro to be even more rewarding than in the past. Some of my favorite moments of the game came about when I would randomly stumble into a new area only to be greeted by some sort of monstrosity that immediately murdered me. Sure, there was a bit of frustration that would stem from my death but also a sense of wonder at, “What did I just come across?”

For all the praise that FromSoftware has received in the realm of creating great combat and boss encounters in their games over the years, I really do think the studio’s best quality is how it creates these vast, interconnected worlds. The original Dark Souls does a phenomenal job of this, but I think that same design where locations are interwoven in a novel way is on full display here in Sekiro and it’s maybe the studio’s best effort yet. Plus, the locales on display are just really stylized and enjoyable to look at.

There are also a few new additions to Sekiro that I really appreciated this time around. For starters, the advent of an actual narrative in the game was more welcome than I thought it’d be. While it’s no BioShock or The Last of Us in terms of storytelling prowess, it was nice to actually have a direct conflict that I understood more than having all of the lore and world-building done through item descriptions.

I also have to say that after some initial hesitation, I ended up enjoying the character progression in Sekiro as well. Even though there are a whole lot of different items you need to collect to level up various skills, abilities, health bars, and so on, the way in which you steadily level up over the course of the experience without becoming too overpowered keeps things in check. As much as I love the Souls games, you really can just cheese the progression system by endlessly grinding until you’re so powerful that bosses and other enemies become a breeze to defeat. That never really happens in Sekiro, which is nice because it means you then need actual skill to overcome some of the game’s harder challenges.

If there’s really any one aspect of Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice that I have a bone to pick with, it’d be the camera. While the camera in the Souls games have been troublesome in the past, I found what was on display here in Sekiro to be worse than ever before. I think a lot of this stems from the 1v1 nature of many encounters you’re faced with in the game; because you’re focused on single targets so often, the way the camera moves behind you can get awkward and clunky at times. Specifically, when you’re pressed up too close to a wall, you’ll immediately lose track of your character and be forced to stop locking on to your foe and get away from the wall. I died to a boss more than once in Sekiro purely because I couldn’t see what was happening at a given time. This game is already hard enough as it is and I didn’t need the difficulty to be amplified even further because of a troublesome camera.

From top to bottom, Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice is another winner for FromSoftware, a studio that I truly believe is the best in the entire video game industry right now. To continue to deliver time and time again with such high-quality products like this is rarely seen, and the studio deserves endless praise for such. Even though the shift in formula from past Souls ventures was questionable at first, FromSoftware has proven with Sekiro that whatever they might decide to do in the future will likely continue to be excellent.

More than anything though, Sekiro is a game that I am endlessly thankful for having spent time with the past few weeks. The moments of elation that I have had playing through Sekiro were unmatched not only in gaming but in my everyday life. It provided a sense of joy that comforted me and made me optimistic when I needed it most. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice is a game I will continue to look back at fondly for years to come because of this.

The post Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Review — The Will to Continue On by Logan Moore appeared first on DualShockers.



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God of War Director Says Accessibility Options Never Hinder His Artistic Vision


Always leave it up to Sony Santa Monica and God of War director Cory Barlog to be the even-keeled voice in the room. Over the past couple of weeks, a debate has been raging among the development, critic, and average gamers on whether difficult games should come with accessibility options, and to what extent developers should dedicate to bringing those options to light. Barlog has offered a succinct response to critics: “Accessibility has never and will never be a compromise to my [artistic] vision.”

To give the background to where this debate originated, many critics (both formal and informal) of From Software’s latest game, Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice, have called for more prominent accessibility options. While there is no general consensus on what these options would be, the pot truly began stirring with a Forbes headline: “Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Needs to Respect its Players and Add an Easy Mode.”

Not to dive into the actual back and forth on that, there has been a healthy amount of dialogue on both sides. On one hand, people argue that adding an “Easy Mode” would compromise the artistic vision of old-school difficulty titles like Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice or Bloodborne; other note that Easy Modes are optional by nature, and would only help more players enjoy a game if they choose not to take the challenge.  Then obviously there is the third group, who point out that “accessibility options” don’t always mean Easy Mode — they can come down to various audio-visual queues, button remapping, and tools to slow down gameplay for those less able to match speeds of the standard gamer.

Speaking to that last point, Able Gamers COO Steve Spohn make jabs at gaming journalists and pundits, often misrepresenting the argument as solely an “Easy Mode” discussion:

The recurring counterpoint to this has been “to what extent should accessibility compromise the artistic vision” of the game itself? Is a work of art suddenly cheapened with the addition of these options.

To that question, Cory Barlog drew from his experience at Sony Santa Monica and God of War, offering a resounding statement:

On the other hand, don’t take Barlog’s comments as being an indictment of developers and publishers who don’t have the capacity to add these options in. He even mentions that there were additional options in the pipeline for God of War that he wasn’t able to get to based on time and bandwidth:

No matter where you fall on the debate on accessibility, it’s hard to deny that Barlog has the experience to really give a good call on what a AAA developer is capable of doing. Especially given the fact that God of War is by all metrics one of (if not the best game of 2018).

We’ve talked a bit about accessibility at DualShockers, noting some of the better versions of it in Apex Legends as well as some of the major shortcomings in Spyro Reignited Trilogy and Borderlands 2 VR. Meanwhile, God of War is still capturing news lately — whether it was coming on top of the 2019 BAFTA Awards or appearing on the front cover of Men’s Health.

God of War is currently available exclusively for PS4. If you have not picked up the game, you can do so right here through Amazon. After all of the praise that I have just given the game, you are still wary about picking it up, then check out DualShockers’ review of God of War where we awarded the game a 10 out of 10.

The post God of War Director Says Accessibility Options Never Hinder His Artistic Vision by Lou Contaldi appeared first on DualShockers.



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Yoshi’s Crafted World Debuts at Number One on UK Charts as Sekiro Falls to Third


Despite some stiff multiplatform competition, Nintendo’s latest Switch-exclusive Yoshi’s Crafted World has found itself at the top of the weekly UK sales chart in its first week of availability.

Releasing this past Friday, Yoshi’s Crafted World was able to beat out both Ubisoft’s The Division 2 and last week’s top-seller Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice. The Switch itself continues to sell incredibly well and it seems like purchasers of the console are showing up to buy games for the platform in droves once they arrive.

As for the aforementioned titles, The Division 2 found itself coming in at second place on the chart this week while Sekiro dropped down into third. FIFA 19 was once again in fourth as Mario Kart 8 Deluxe surged ahead to round out this past week’s top five entries. Assassin’s Creed III Remastered, which also released last week, found itself debuting at ninth overall while Generation Zero slotted in at nineteenth.

To get a full look at the top-40 from last week, you can check it out below.

Last Week This Week Title Age Rating Publisher
1 YOSHI’S CRAFTED WORLD PEGI 3+ NINTENDO
2 2 TOM CLANCY’S THE DIVISION 2 PEGI 18+ UBISOFT
1 3 SEKIRO: SHADOWS DIE TWICE PEGI 18+ ACTIVISION
3 4 FIFA 19 PEGI 3+ EA SPORTS
6 5 MARIO KART 8 DELUXE PEGI 3+ NINTENDO
9 6 FAR CRY NEW DAWN PEGI 18+ UBISOFT
5 7 RED DEAD REDEMPTION 2 PEGI 18+ ROCKSTAR
7 8 THE LEGO MOVIE 2 VIDEOGAME PEGI 7+ WARNER BROS. INTERACTIVE
9 ASSASSIN’S CREED III REMASTERED PEGI 18+ UBISOFT
8 10 FORZA HORIZON 4 PEGI 3+ MICROSOFT
4 11 GRAND THEFT AUTO V PEGI 18+ ROCKSTAR
10 12 NEW SUPER MARIO BROS. U DELUXE PEGI 3+ NINTENDO
11 13 SUPER SMASH BROS. ULTIMATE PEGI 12+ NINTENDO
12 14 CRASH BANDICOOT N.SANE TRILOGY PEGI 7+ ACTIVISION
18 15 BATTLEFIELD V PEGI 16+ EA GAMES
14 16 SUPER MARIO ODYSSEY PEGI 7+ NINTENDO
13 17 DEVIL MAY CRY 5 PEGI 18+ CAPCOM
20 18 THE LEGEND OF ZELDA: BREATH OF THE WILD PEGI 12+ NINTENDO
19 GENERATION ZERO PEGI 12+ THQ NORDIC
21 20 CALL OF DUTY: BLACK OPS 4 PEGI 18+ ACTIVISION
16 21 POKEMON: LET’S GO, PIKACHU! PEGI 7+ NINTENDO
24 22 SPYRO REIGNITED TRILOGY PEGI 7+ ACTIVISION
23 THE WALKING DEAD: THE FINAL SEASON PEGI 18+ SKYBOUND GAMES
24 OUTWARD PEGI 12+ DEEP SILVER
19 25 MINECRAFT PEGI 7+ NINTENDO
25 26 PLAYSTATION VR WORLDS PEGI 16+ SONY COMPUTER ENT.
23 27 MARVEL’S SPIDER-MAN PEGI 16+ SONY COMPUTER ENT.
17 28 SUPER MARIO PARTY PEGI 3+ NINTENDO
22 29 RESIDENT EVIL 2 PEGI 18+ CAPCOM
15 30 ANTHEM PEGI 16+ EA GAMES
27 31 METRO EXODUS PEGI 18+ DEEP SILVER
26 32 FORTNITE: DEEP FREEZE BUNDLE PEGI 12+ WARNER BROS. INTERACTIVE
30 33 ASTRO BOT RESCUE MISSION PEGI 7+ SONY COMPUTER ENT.
34 THE SIMS 4 PEGI 12+ EA GAMES
35 JUST CAUSE 4 PEGI 18+ SQUARE ENIX
34 36 THE ELDER SCROLLS V: SKYRIM VR PEGI 18+ BETHESDA SOFTWORKS
32 37 DOOM VFR PEGI 18+ BETHESDA SOFTWORKS
35 38 WIPEOUT: OMEGA COLLECTION PEGI 7+ SONY COMPUTER ENT.
29 39 LEGO MARVEL SUPER HEROES 2 PEGI 7+ WARNER BROS. INTERACTIVE
31 40 SPLATOON 2 PEGI 7+ NINTENDO

The post Yoshi’s Crafted World Debuts at Number One on UK Charts as Sekiro Falls to Third by Logan Moore appeared first on DualShockers.



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Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Was Almost Part of the Tenchu Series


When Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice was first teased at The Game Awards in 2017, many thought that the brief new video that was shown was teasing either Bloodborne 2 or a new Tenchu game, a series that FromSoftware had worked on in the past. Heck, we thought it was for sure Tenchu ourselves when we first saw it as well. Months later at E3 2018, From revealed that the game was instead an entirely new IP called Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice and while it surprised some that it didn’t belong to any previously existing franchises, this wasn’t always what was planned.

In a new conversation with Variety, FromSoftware president Hidetaka Miyazaki said that they initially thought about making Sekiro part of the Techu franchise. “A lot of influence came from Tenchu,” Miyazaki said of the early stages of Sekiro’s development. “We even pondered upon making Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice a part of the Tenchu series at first.”

Miyazaki went on to say though that after more time, they decided it would be better if Sekiro was its own property, though he still acknowledged that Tenchu as a whole was one of the primary inspirations behind the game. “Of course, after that we researched and referenced many other games as well; however, I think the largest influence was from Tenchu,” Miyazaki said. This lines up with what From told us as well last year about how Sekiro evolved over time to be a completely different game.

As of now, it has been 10 years since the release of the last Tenchu game–Tenchu: Shadow Assassins–and while fans of the series are surely hoping that it will one day see a revival, it’s good to know that FromSoftware still looks back on the series fondly. If a spiritual successor of sorts in Sekiro isn’t good enough for you, then maybe one day From or someone else will finally bring it back.

In the meantime, Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice is slated to launch next Friday, March 22, for PS4, Xbox One, and PC.

The post Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Was Almost Part of the Tenchu Series by Logan Moore appeared first on DualShockers.



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Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Gameplay Video Descends into the Hirata Estates


During GameInformer’s coverage of Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice for their cover story a new gameplay video showing off the Hirata Estates appeared.

In it the player character Sekiro approaches the Hirata Estates from on high, quickly descending towards the enemies below thanks to the grappling hook. Commentators Dan Tacka nd Suriel Vazquez talk over the short gameplay clip with impressions and context for the footage. Immediately the video makes it clear that From Software will not be relying on enclosed corridors for sneak attacks from hidden enemies in Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice, at least not all the time. The grappling hook is great for mobility and also allows for sequence breaking as skillful use of it will allow players to access areas not intended to be reached until further along in the game, a feature seen prominently in games such as the Metroid and Castlevania series.

Mutant roosters are mentioned but sadly not shown, and Sekiro can swim, swiftly too. Most all movement in this game is looking to be much faster than Dark Souls or even Bloodborne. Instead of walls that are, in fact, illusions, Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice will feature revolving doors to better fit in with the overall aesthetic and time period of the game.

The Hirata Estates is not an area found by completing the main questline in Sekiro. Instead it is a memory accessed by a magical bell. The boss of this level is a butterfly hag who is also sadly not shown. There are also mini-bosses in this area, and killing them will replenish your stock of lives which plays into the death/resurrection mechanic of Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice.

Unfortunately the short gameplay video is not able to be embedded as it is only viewable via GameInformer’s proprietary video player so you’ll have to visit their article to watch the minute and 48 second video. Meanwhile you can read our coverage of their coverage, disseminating the most important bits of news such as the game’s central hub and the ability to pause the game. Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice will be releasing on March 22, 2019 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Meanwhile, From Software has two other unannounced projects in the works, though don’t expect one of them to be King’s Field.

The post Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice Gameplay Video Descends into the Hirata Estates by Steven Santana appeared first on DualShockers.



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Details on Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice’s Central Hub Have Emerged


New information on Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice continues to emerge this week, painting a clearer picture of what we can expect when the action title releases this March.

In a series of new details from Game Informer, an explanation of the hub area of Sekiro has been given and it sounds fairly similar to what players of past FromSoftware games have come to anticipate. This location is called the Dilapidated Temple and will be available to frequently come back to once you make your way past a certain part of the game’s story. Once you unlock the temple, you’ll be able to revisit it at any point by traversing from one of Sekiro’s idols, which are essentially this game’s equivalent of bonfires from Dark Souls or lanterns from Bloodborne.

As for what there is to find in the Dilapidated Temple, there will be a variety of different NPCs which can aid you in different areas. One such character is known as The Sculptor, and he allows you to progress your character’s skills. Another character named Emma can help you increase the number of uses of your healing item, while another named The Immortal Soldier will allow you to practice combat techniques.

FromSoftware is teasing though that these three aforementioned characters might not be the only ones that you can get to join you at the Dilapidated Temple, though. “If you’re familiar with the Souls games, you know how you can find NPCs in the world. Maybe they’re vendors, maybe they do something with you, maybe they head back to the hub, where you can speak to them and progress their quests,” said From’s marketing and communications manager, Yasuhiro Kitao to Game Informer. While there will be a lot of differences in Sekiro compared to the Souls games–take the addition of an actual pause button, for instance–the game’s central hub is one that sounds like it’ll be very much in-line with From’s past titles.

Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice is slated to release on March 22 for Xbox One, PS4, and PC. We’ll surely continue to gather more details about the game over the next few months leading to launch, so stay tuned.

The post Details on Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice’s Central Hub Have Emerged by Logan Moore appeared first on DualShockers.



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